Teacher’s Guide to Home Economics: 3 Sweet School Recipes for Easter

With Easter just past, all attention was duly turned to the tasty treats of simnel cake, bunny biscuits and Easter nests. Working in a school means you get more excitement than most when it comes to such delicacies  – so if you’re tiring of the 100+ variations of fairy cake or shortbread recipes, why not introduce something new to the classroom?

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Here are 3 easy Easter recipes for next years (gives you plenty of time to prepare!) that might just spark your (and your students’) interest. Perfect as a sweet snack for the kids to eat on the way home, or dressed up as a special Easter gift for Mum, these yummy treats should go down a storm.

Hot Cross Cookies

Putting the best of Easter in a simple cookie recipe, these little bakes are as delicious as they are visually appealing.

Ingredients: 200g butter (softened), 100g light brown sugar, 1 egg, 250g plain flour, 2tsp baking powder, 1tsp cinnamon, 100g raisins, 200g white chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 180C and lightly grease several baking trays.

Cream together the butter, sugar and egg in a large bowl, then sift in the flour, baking powder and cinnamon. Mix together to form a dough, and add in the raisins and half of the chocolate.

Take small quantities and roll into a golf ball, then flatten onto the baking tray, leaving enough room for expansion while they bake. Bake for 10 minutes until golden, then remove from baking tray and cool on a wire rack.

Melt the rest of the chocolate in the microwave (on low power, in 20-second bursts until melted) and carefully drizzle a cross shape on each of the cookies. Leave to set until cool before serving.

DIY Chocolate Eggs

Teach the students the trick of making their own solid chocolate Easter eggs and see them swell with pride at their achievement. It’s really not difficult to do, but does require a steady hand, so bear this in mind when planning the lesson.

Ingredients: 200g milk chocolate, 1tsp chocolate extract, 3 eggs

Hold a raw egg carefully in one hand and make a hole in the base with a pin or needle, then enlarge the whole with a skewer or cocktail stick until 5mm in diameter. Try to pierce the egg yolk inside while you’re at it. Make another, smaller hole in the opposite end of the egg. Gently hold the egg over a bowl and blow through the small hole until all the egg contents have been removed in this way. Repeat the process with the other two eggs.

Carefully wash out the eggs with hot water, then dry out and sterilise in the oven on a low heat for ½ hour.

Melt the chocolate in a spouted jug in the microwave until smooth and add the chocolate extract. Pour the melted chocolate into the eggs via the larger hole until full, then leave to set overnight. Finally, use a teaspoon to carefully crack the eggshells to reveal the chocolate eggs inside.

Mini Egg Rocky Road Bites

Here’s a new twist on some old Easter favourites that doesn’t even require baking. The result? A delicious Easter treat that’s just a little bit different.

Ingredients: 400g white chocolate pieces, 100g digestive biscuit pieces, 150g mini marshmallows, 100g mini eggs

Line a 7” square cake tin with cling film and set aside. Melt the chocolate on low power in the microwave until completely melted. Stir in the digestives, marshmallows and most of the mini eggs, keeping a few for decorating later.

Pour the mixture into the cake tin and smooth the top with a palette knife, then scatter over the rest of the mini eggs and press them gently into the mix. Put the tray in the fridge to chill for 2-3 hours until set. Cut into 25 small squares and serve.

As they, failing to prepare is as good as preparing to fail… so with 11 months before the next Easter celebration, you have plenty of time to organise a memorable treat… and confirm your status as their favourite teacher!

Article provided by Mike James, an independent content writer working together with Redbox Teachers, a London-based education recruitment specialist providing supply, temporary and permanent positions to teachers across the UK.

Originally posted 2016-04-28 23:44:42. Republished by Blog Post Promoter